International Journal of Immunology

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The Science Underlying the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium in Beneficial Effects on Immunological and Gastrointestinal Health

Received: 26 January 2024    Accepted: 4 February 2024    Published: 21 February 2024
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Abstract

Probiotics have demonstrated a lot of promise in improving gut health in humans. Despite the encouraging data, nothing is known about the therapeutic effectiveness of many of the probiotics on the market, and it's sometimes unclear how they work. Humans have long used Bifidobacterium, a well-known, multifunctional probiotic, to treat gastrointestinal, immunological, and infectious disorders. It is also therapeutically useful. This review provides a theoretical framework for comprehending the mechanisms of action of Bifidobacterium and highlights the functional advantages from the most pertinent animal and clinical trials. The genus Bifidobacterium belongs to the Actinobacteria phylum. = Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria constitute the most abundant phyla in the human intestinal microbiota, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes being predominant in adults, and Actinobacteria in breast-fed infants, where bifidobacteria can reach levels higher than 90% of the total bacterial population. They are among the first microbial colonizers of the intestines of newborns, and play key roles in the development of their physiology, including maturation of the immune system and use of dietary components. Indeed, some nutrients, such as human milk oligosaccharides, are important drivers of bifidobacterial development. Some Bifidobacterium strains are considered probiotic microorganisms because of their beneficial effects, and they have been included as bioactive ingredients in functional foods, mainly dairy products, as well as in food supplements and pharma products, alone, or together with, other microbes or microbial substrates. Well-documented scientific evidence of their activities is currently available for bifidobacteria containing preparations in some intestinal and extraintestinal pathologies. In particular, it regulates luminal metabolism, maintains gut microbiota stability, and eventually promotes a precisely calibrated homeostatic equilibrium in the host-microbiome relationship. An ideal probiotic selection would benefit from clinical proof of the multifunctional activities' efficacy and mechanism of action.

DOI 10.11648/j.iji.20241201.12
Published in International Journal of Immunology (Volume 12, Issue 1, March 2024)
Page(s) 10-18
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Probiotics, Bifidobacterium, Health Benefits, Clinical Efficacy, Gut Microbiota, Intestinal Health, Immunology, Immune Modulation, Immune Response

References
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    Ali, A., Islam, N., Fakir, N. I., Kabir, A., Sharmin, M., et al. (2024). The Science Underlying the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium in Beneficial Effects on Immunological and Gastrointestinal Health. International Journal of Immunology, 12(1), 10-18. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.iji.20241201.12

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    Ali, A.; Islam, N.; Fakir, N. I.; Kabir, A.; Sharmin, M., et al. The Science Underlying the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium in Beneficial Effects on Immunological and Gastrointestinal Health. Int. J. Immunol. 2024, 12(1), 10-18. doi: 10.11648/j.iji.20241201.12

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    Ali A, Islam N, Fakir NI, Kabir A, Sharmin M, et al. The Science Underlying the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium in Beneficial Effects on Immunological and Gastrointestinal Health. Int J Immunol. 2024;12(1):10-18. doi: 10.11648/j.iji.20241201.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.iji.20241201.12,
      author = {Ayub Ali and Nazrul Islam and Nazrul Islam Fakir and Ahsan Kabir and Mowmita Sharmin and Tazul Islam and Masudur Rahman and Fakrul Amin Badal and Abu Taher},
      title = {The Science Underlying the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium in Beneficial Effects on Immunological and Gastrointestinal Health},
      journal = {International Journal of Immunology},
      volume = {12},
      number = {1},
      pages = {10-18},
      doi = {10.11648/j.iji.20241201.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.iji.20241201.12},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.iji.20241201.12},
      abstract = {Probiotics have demonstrated a lot of promise in improving gut health in humans. Despite the encouraging data, nothing is known about the therapeutic effectiveness of many of the probiotics on the market, and it's sometimes unclear how they work. Humans have long used Bifidobacterium, a well-known, multifunctional probiotic, to treat gastrointestinal, immunological, and infectious disorders. It is also therapeutically useful. This review provides a theoretical framework for comprehending the mechanisms of action of Bifidobacterium and highlights the functional advantages from the most pertinent animal and clinical trials. The genus Bifidobacterium belongs to the Actinobacteria phylum. = Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria constitute the most abundant phyla in the human intestinal microbiota, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes being predominant in adults, and Actinobacteria in breast-fed infants, where bifidobacteria can reach levels higher than 90% of the total bacterial population. They are among the first microbial colonizers of the intestines of newborns, and play key roles in the development of their physiology, including maturation of the immune system and use of dietary components. Indeed, some nutrients, such as human milk oligosaccharides, are important drivers of bifidobacterial development. Some Bifidobacterium strains are considered probiotic microorganisms because of their beneficial effects, and they have been included as bioactive ingredients in functional foods, mainly dairy products, as well as in food supplements and pharma products, alone, or together with, other microbes or microbial substrates. Well-documented scientific evidence of their activities is currently available for bifidobacteria containing preparations in some intestinal and extraintestinal pathologies. In particular, it regulates luminal metabolism, maintains gut microbiota stability, and eventually promotes a precisely calibrated homeostatic equilibrium in the host-microbiome relationship. An ideal probiotic selection would benefit from clinical proof of the multifunctional activities' efficacy and mechanism of action.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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    AU  - Ayub Ali
    AU  - Nazrul Islam
    AU  - Nazrul Islam Fakir
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    JF  - International Journal of Immunology
    JO  - International Journal of Immunology
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    AB  - Probiotics have demonstrated a lot of promise in improving gut health in humans. Despite the encouraging data, nothing is known about the therapeutic effectiveness of many of the probiotics on the market, and it's sometimes unclear how they work. Humans have long used Bifidobacterium, a well-known, multifunctional probiotic, to treat gastrointestinal, immunological, and infectious disorders. It is also therapeutically useful. This review provides a theoretical framework for comprehending the mechanisms of action of Bifidobacterium and highlights the functional advantages from the most pertinent animal and clinical trials. The genus Bifidobacterium belongs to the Actinobacteria phylum. = Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria constitute the most abundant phyla in the human intestinal microbiota, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes being predominant in adults, and Actinobacteria in breast-fed infants, where bifidobacteria can reach levels higher than 90% of the total bacterial population. They are among the first microbial colonizers of the intestines of newborns, and play key roles in the development of their physiology, including maturation of the immune system and use of dietary components. Indeed, some nutrients, such as human milk oligosaccharides, are important drivers of bifidobacterial development. Some Bifidobacterium strains are considered probiotic microorganisms because of their beneficial effects, and they have been included as bioactive ingredients in functional foods, mainly dairy products, as well as in food supplements and pharma products, alone, or together with, other microbes or microbial substrates. Well-documented scientific evidence of their activities is currently available for bifidobacteria containing preparations in some intestinal and extraintestinal pathologies. In particular, it regulates luminal metabolism, maintains gut microbiota stability, and eventually promotes a precisely calibrated homeostatic equilibrium in the host-microbiome relationship. An ideal probiotic selection would benefit from clinical proof of the multifunctional activities' efficacy and mechanism of action.
    
    VL  - 12
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Author Information
  • Department of Pediatrics, President Abdul Hamid Medical College Hospital, Kishoreganj, Bangladesh

  • Department of Neonatology, Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh, Bangladesh

  • Department of Pediatrics, Shah Sultan Diagnostic Center & Hospital, Sherpur, Bangladesh

  • Department of Pediatrics, Adhunik Sadar Hospital, Netrakona, Bangladesh

  • Department of Pediatrics, Adhunik Sadar Hospital, Netrakona, Bangladesh

  • Department of Pediatrics, Jamalpur General Hospital, Jamalpur, Bangladesh

  • Department of Pediatrics, Shahjamal General Pvt. Hospital, Jamalpur, Bangladesh

  • Department of Pediatrics, Ziaur Rahman Medical College & Hospital, Tangail, Bangladesh

  • Department of Pediatrics, Sheikh Hasina Medical College & Hospital, Tangail, Bangladesh

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